The other day my 5-year-old daughter, Bia, asked if she could give her Tooth Fairy money to her friend Victoria.

Let me explain.

We live in Brazil. In an area that is so beautifully diverse. The city is called Olinda. And on my street we have one of the poorest families I’ve probably ever known. And beside them, two houses down, is a house owned by one of the richest men in Switzerland.

Victoria lives in the first house.

She often plays at our place. But last week, it was the first time that Bia played at her house. And that evening she returned, raising the question.

I asked her why she wanted to give her money to Victoria, checking that Victoria hadn’t asked for it. And she simply said that it was her idea, and that she doesn’t need it as much as Victoria does.

I think this is the first time she became aware of haves, and have nots.

We agreed that giving money probably wasn’t the answer. But I asked her how else she could show her friendship.

She then came up with the idea to invite Victoria over, and together, they would do a lemonade & cookie stand. And they would split the proceeds.

We did this last weekend, and it was a huge success. Not only did it generate much more money than her Tooth Fairy money. But you should have seen the two of them. And the smiles on their faces.

There is a lot going on in the world right now.

But what is clear.

People want to help others. It’s human nature. And they get so much out of it.

TIE creates life-changing adventures for people, and then joins them for ultimately one of the richest and most valuable experiences they will ever be a part of.

But why do the future leaders of the industry apply for TIE? What are they yearning for?

We were keen to know, and thought you would find the answers interesting too.

Keep reading to get into the heads of five of the many people that have been involved with TIE this year.

 

Kate Nicoli“I’m hell bent on finding a way not to view my professional career (advertising) and my personal need (to do good) as two mutually exclusive, even opposing, forces, but to find a way for me, and many others in our industry to more frequently and more illustriously, create powerful communications that make the world a better place” – Kate Nicoli, ‎Board Account Director at Leo Burnett

 

Tom Reas“Why am I jumping on the opportunity to get involved with TIE? Honestly because it scares me. The experiences I have enjoyed and learnt from most so far in life seem to be the ones that forced me to take deep calming breaths before them. Fear, in my experience is usually followed by awesome.” – Tom Reas, Copywriter at Grey London

 

 

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“TIE will give me the opportunity to develop my communications and leadership skills, consolidating everything I have learnt over the last three years, as well as teaching me lessons I can’t yet imagine.” – Claire Carmichael, Planner at GPY&R and WPP fellow

 

 

 

“One of the biggest challenges in account management is when you’re faced with an unprecedented problem and have to build a solution from scratch. It can be a scary proposition when you don’t have history to guide you, but these instances are inevitable in our business. To that end, I would hope to return from TIE able to more confidently face these situations after having spent time problem-solving for an organization that’s completely foreign to me.” – Lauren Smith, Account Supervisor at Wieden+Kennedy

 

Elisa Birtwistle“I’ve realized that all the wonderful experience and confidence I’ve built in doing my job means I very rarely feel the rush of being completely and utterly out of my comfort zone. TIE could be a way to bring the things in which I’m very confident to an NGO, coupled with an opportunity to be inventive, in a new context, and test myself in areas in which I have less experience” – Elisa Birtwistle, Director of Human and Cultural Foresight at The Futures Company and WPP Fellow.